Song of Wind and Water review

17 09 2008

Well, I have been busy with the last week of school for Term 3, but have had a chance to paint up a good amount of figures. I will be updating with all the information, some photos and other tidbits probably on Friday (but hopefully earlier) So please check back later in the week (I love visitors!) Also, please don’t be shy in commenting, it’s great to know what people are up to. So if you are undertaking a similar project, or have some advice, or just want to say hi… go for it! 🙂 It would be great to hear from you!

But in the meantime, Andrea, from Ganesha Games has just released Song of Wind and Water, the second supplement to Song of Blades and Heroes. So since I’m a big fan, I wanted to have a go at writing a review, so here goes. 🙂

Song of Wind and Water review

Song of Wind and Water is the second supplement for Ganesha Game’s Song of Blades and Heroes (SoBH). Song of Blades and Heroes has only been on the gaming scene for a short while, but has quickly gained popularity. The activation of models, fast play style and the ability to use any models you own are three excellent explanations as to why it’s popularity has grown so fast.

This is a short review of the new supplement Song of Wind and Water (SWW). It is my first formal review, so please take that into account whilst reading this. J

I should first preface this review by making it clear that I was involved with the playtesting of this supplement, but I feel that I can still approach the review with an even hand.

A general overview of the supplement…

Song of Wind and Water introduces the forces of nature into you skirmish games. It has rules for weather conditions, new terrain, a slew of special abilities and a collection of creature/character rosters that are appropriate to the setting.

How is the book set out?

Song of Wind and Water is broken up into seven separate chapters, which are followed by a short FAQ section, the creature profiles and a summary sheet for the new options presented in SWW. There are some ink drawings throughout the book as well. Some of which I think are excellent. There are a couple however that suffer a little because they look stretched to fit the free space on the page. But really, these are minor complaints that don’t affect my opinion of the book at all. I think the layout of the book was thought out carefully, and is very easy to follow. The index at the start of the book is more than adequate to help you find what you are after quickly.

What’s in it exactly?

The first four chapters of the book address the four elements: Air, Earth, Fire and Water. For example, the chapter on Air introduces concepts such as weather, storms, heatwaves and lighting to the game. The section on Earth introduces no less than 22 new terrain types to use in your games. The fire section includes using Fire in your games (obviously!) and the section on Water includes things such as rivers, boats and waterfalls (among other things).

The options that these four chapters offer you is worth the price of admission alone ($8 for the PDF), but the book doesn’t stop there.

The fifth chapter establishes 19 new Special rules that you can add to your figures. These include simple things such as being able to ignore movement penalties when in certain types of terrain, to much more complex abilities such as Running Blow – which is one of my favourites as it allows you to basically do a hit and run attack in a straight line; great for representing things like ninjas (mutated reptile or otherwise), velociraptors and other fast or agile critters. If you have been playing SoBH for a while, you will be most pleased to know that the Sharpshooter ability is also included, giving your specialty ranged troops more definition.

Chapter six contains two special situation abilities that your troops can employ and chapter seven has two detailed scenarios to sink your teeth into. My favourite of the two was ‘Song of the Ancient Ones’ which was great fun to play.

Chapter seven has a mass of creature/character profiles to help you out if you don’t want to create your own stats straight off the bat. I was exceedingly pleased to see a whole page devoted to Frogfolk (a race which I find sadly lacking in today’s fantasy worlds… I mean come on, they’re frogs! J), but there are also Nymphs, Apemen, the Silva (plantmen), Pigsnout Orcs, Nemesis Goblins, Dinosaurs and a slew of monsters.

The content in SWW really adds to the depth of the game without complicating it or making it longer to play. Whilst reading through the game (and whilst playtesting it) I constantly found myself going “Ohh, well that’s heaps easier doing it that way” and “That’s a cool way to do that”. If you have grown to love Song of Blades and Heroes as I have, you would appreciate the hidden depth in a simple game. SWW provides a myriad of options to add to your games without ruining the original feel of the game.

In summary, Song of Wind and Water is a worthy supplement to an excellent game. If you enjoyed the original and/or Song of Gold and Darkness, then you will love this. If you’ve never played Song of Blades and Heroes before, why not give it a try? The base game is only $4 PDF. Song of Wind and Water is only $8 for the PDF.

You can pick them up (and other Ganesha Games) at www.songofblades.blogspot.com or

http://www.lulu.com/songofblades

If this review helped you at all, or you have some suggestions/comments to make it better, please feel free to leave a comment so that I can improve any further reviews that I post.

Thanks again,

– Ben.

PS. For all you Frog fans out there, if you are after frog miniatures you can find some awesome little guys in 28mm from Eureka Miniatures (which you can see in the Song of Blades section of this site and in 15mm you can get some from East Riding Miniatures (which you can see in the Mighty Armies section of this site… cheeky I know, but I love my frog miniatures!)

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One response

21 09 2008
PMMJ

Good review! I’m just getting into SBH, and it sounds like this expansion has even more good stuff.

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